Specialty Course

PADI Specialty Courses increase your knowledge and skills and therefor helping you to become a MSD.  You pick which specialty courses are either of use to you or interest you.  Each course pushes you closer to the coveted MSD qualification.

Deep DiverMAL07_3249_2DvrsFishSchl-Snrkl-FlatSM

It’s a rare diver who hasn’t felt the urge to dive deep. Deep diving opens the door to many new exciting dive sites like deeper wrecks, reefs and walls. As a rule, divers tend to be adventurous people, and deep diving – whether to visit a wreck or take photos – can certainly be called adventurous. It’s only natural that like most divers, you have some interest in deep diving.

Deep diving is a means to an end. You make a deep dive to see, to do or to experience something that you can’t on a shallower dive. There’s no reason to make a deep dive if you can make essentially the same dive at a shallower depth.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport with two of the three dives on the world famous Zenobia Wreck. €220

Digital Underwater Photographydupbanner

The PADI Digital Underwater Photographer Specialty course is a two-part (Level One and Level Two) introduction to digital underwater photography centred on today’s point-and-shoot digital cameras. The course helps student divers develop the knowledge, skills and practical techniques necessary to obtain excellent photographs with a digital camera, even on their first photo dive.

It is a materials-driven course intended for a broad audience – snorkelers, Discover Scuba Diving participants*, Open Water Diver students* and certified divers. The course is primarily for those interested in learning the basics of digital underwater photography.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €165

Emergency Oxygen Provider

Oxygen, water, and food are fundamentally important to all animals. Of these three basic essentials for the maintenance of life, the lack of oxygen leads to death most rapidly.

First aid with emergency oxygen is useful or necessary as a treatment for many injuries, diseases and intoxications that interfere with oxygen reaching the blood or tissues. For recreational scuba divers, emergency oxygen is the primary first aid given to individuals suffering from a near drowning or decompression illness (lung overexpansion injuries and decompression sickness).

Providing emergency oxygen has become the standard of practice for treating injured scuba divers since it provides oxygen to starved tissues and aids in bubble reduction. Having emergency oxygen immediately available at dive locations is especially important to divers suffering from these maladies. Along with the availability of oxygen at dive sites, first responders must know how to provide oxygen in an emergency. I

t is the goal of this course to train all divers (PADI Junior Open Water Divers and above) and those in a position to help divers (boat captains, lifeguards, etc.) in the proper use of emergency oxygen. This entry-level emergency oxygen course also teaches the recognition of diving illnesses treatable by emergency oxygen, but the specific details of dive accident response and management are left to the PADI Rescue Diver course.

The PADI Emergency Oxygen Provider Specialty course may be used as an enhanced substitute for the emergency oxygen training provided in the PADI Rescue Diver course.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €120

Enriched Air Diver

Scuba Diving with Enriched Air Nitrox

The PADI Enriched Air Diver specialty course is PADI’s most popular specialty scuba diving course, and it’s easy to see why. Scuba diving with enriched air nitrox gives you more no decompression dive time. This means more time underwater, especially on repetitive scuba dives.

The Fun Part

You can typically stay down longer and get back in the water sooner. No wonder many divers choose this as their very first specialty.

What You Learn

  • Techniques for getting more dive time by using enriched air nitrox
  • Enriched air scuba diving equipment considerations
  • Enriched air considerations, including managing oxygen exposure, how to tell what’s in your scuba tank and how to set your dive computer.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €195

 

MultilevelThe PADI Multilevel Diver Course

Maximize your dive time so you can explore more!

In this specialty course, you learn how to plan dives that extend your bottom time by crediting you for slower nitrogen absorption when you ascend to a shallower depth. That’s the way you really dive, after all.

The Fun Part

This is a great way to learn how to make multilevel dives even if you forget to bring your dive computer.

What You Learn

You’ll learn what multilevel diving is and why you want to plan for multilevel dives. You’ll also get to see the various types of multilevel dive calculators (including dive computers), as well as learn about multilevel dive planning, organization, procedures, techniques, and potential problems. You’ll plan a multilevel dive profile and dive it with your PADI Instructor.

You learn how to:

  • Plan and execute multilevel dives (different depths on the same dive)
  • Back up your dive computer and plan multilevel dives
  • Maximize your no stop time

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €150

Night Diver

Is it natural curiosity?

Is it getting a new look at the familiar?

Could it be the vibrant changing colours of aquatic life?

Or, is it just because you can, that night diving is so popular?

Whatever the motivation to dive at night – you’ll find that the environment is quite different. Imagine hovering over a large pumpkin-size brain coral, and watching a group of parrotfish that are easily three to four feet (one to one and a half metres) long, weighing in at 22 to 27 kilograms (50 to 60 pounds) each trying to sleep.

The creatures, paying no attention to you, on some secret signal from one of their group, lower their heads under the reef ledge and secrete a mucous sack that envelope their bodies rather like a bubble.

Typically, these interesting creatures wouldn’t spend the time of day with a diver; however, the cover of night changes their behaviour. Picture your dive light penetrating the cold dark emerald sea. You see her lying there on her side. You feel what the hapless crew must have felt on that cold stormy day – you begin to have that uncomfortable sensation as you descend through the night above her main deck. Suddenly, a slithery wolf eel darts out of the darkness in front of you and you realize the sea has begun to give her new life.

What had once been a wheelhouse of a container ship is now a home for marine life. Thousands of cold-water friends scurry out of their hiding places by the unintentional blinding of your light. You move cautiously and slowly to allow the timid nightlife to settle.

Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on seeing in the dark things you miss seeing, or that appear differently during daylight dives. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying diving at night.

Student divers will develop the techniques involved in night diving within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €180

Peak Performance Buoyancy

The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy Course

What is neutral buoyancy? Scuba divers like to be neutrally buoyant so they neither sink nor float. It can be a tricky thing. Divers who’ve mastered the highest performance levels in buoyancy stand apart. You’ve seen them underwater. They glide effortlessly, use less air and ascend, descend or hover, almost as if by thought. They interact gently with aquatic life and affect their surroundings minimally. The PADI Peak Performance Buoyancy course refines the basic skills you learned as a PADI Open Water Diver and elevates them to the next level.

The Fun Part

The fun part of this course is giving your dive skills a polish you may not have thought possible.

What You Learn

  • How to trim your scuba gear so you’re perfectly balanced in the water
  • How to streamline to save air and move smoothly through the water
  • How to hover effortlessly in both a vertical position and a horizontal position

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €140

 

Underwater Navigation

Early Polynesian navigators routinely crossed thousands of miles of open ocean in outrigger canoes, using only their own senses and knowledge, a tradition passed down from generation to generation.

These early peoples used natural navigation clues such as the motion of specific stars, weather, wildlife species, and directions of swells on the ocean, colours of the sea and sky and angles of approaching harbours to navigate their way from point A to point B on the ocean’s surface.

Today, we still use natural navigation clues to navigate above and below the water, but the invention of the compass and other navigational instruments makes navigation a much easier albeit still a very challenging task. Despite more than an hour underwater and covering a lot of ground, scuba divers can successfully reach their intended mark by integrating natural navigation techniques (environmental observation) and their skill of using instruments like the compass.

Whether you’re first navigation dive or your hundredth, few moments in diving compare with the satisfaction and pride you feel when you navigate a distance or specific navigation pattern and hit your mark dead-on.

Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on fun and challenging underwater navigation dives with an emphasis on safety. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying underwater navigation.

Student divers will develop the techniques involved in navigating underwater within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €175

Wreck Diver

Diving through 9 metres/30 feet, then 12 metres/40 feet, 15 metres/50 feet, and finally 18 metres/60 feet of silty azure blue salt water, you see her lying there like a wounded bird, one of her wings fractured and one of her engines gone.

Did enemy fighters blow away her engine?

Was its loss plunging her from the tropical sky more than 40 years ago?

She was a B-25, an Allied workhorse of World War II in the Pacific. You don’t have to stretch your imagination too far to see her in her original state, ready to fight again. Her crumpled nose houses two machine guns – still stacked with bullets – now covered with hard coral, algae, and crimson red gorgonians. The cockpit escape hatch sits open, slid back as it had been on that fateful day in 1943.

It was clear to see that the pilot had cleverly ditched his bomber in a narrow shallow strait between Wongat Island and mainland New Guinea. Did the crew swim to the island? Did Japanese forces capture them? How old were these men? Twenty? Twenty-one? You watch as parrotfish dine on a coral incrusted machine-gun barrel. Two angelfish casually glide through the bomb bay doors while translucent shrimp dance their way over the rusty face of the altimeter gauge.

Diving on wrecks appeals to most divers, though for many different reasons. You may find yourself attracted to the challenge of exploring the wreck, or a fascination with its historical nature. Underwater photographers love wrecks for their picture potential, while those interested in nature like the fact that wrecks quickly become artificial reefs.

Wrecks are typically ships, but can include railroad cars, aircraft and automobiles. In these, you’ll find wreck sites range from those open to novice, to those only accessible by the most experienced technical divers. Whether you’re first or you’re hundredth dive on a wreck, few moments in diving compare with descending on the past.

Keep that thought, the philosophy of this course is to focus on fun, safe wreck diving. Thus, the goal of this course is to teach student divers a systematic, methodical approach to enjoying wreck diving.

Student divers will develop the techniques involved in wreck diving within recreational limits and while avoiding disturbing delicate marine life.

Cost Includes all equipment required, manuals, certification and transport. €250